Popular Pastries In Italian Culture

dessert-812050_640When someone says pastry, most minds will jump to sweet, delicious dessert type treats. While many pastries are eventually turned into a sweet treat, pastries can actually be sweet or savory. Something is considered a pastry when it is in a dough form created with water, shortening, and flour. With Italian pastries, you get a bit of both as some popular types of pastries are sweet while others can be more savory.

One of the most popular sweet, according to a quick New York City Search Engine Optimization check is Italian pastries is cannoli. Cannoli first originated in Sicily and have remained a staple throughout the years. Cannoli have also become very popular in Italian-based American cuisine. Cannoli are created by filling fried pastry dough with a sweet filling. Traditionally, the cream filling is created using ricotta. In America, you can occasionally find cannoli that skip the ricotta and use mascarpone or a simple custard for the filling.

Another sweet, Italian pastry is called bruttiboni. Bruttiboni is mostly made in central Italy, or Prato. This type of pastry is traditionally a biscuit that is either flavored with almond or hazelnut. To create these cookies, meringue is incorporated with chopped nuts that have been roasted.

In Italy, a savory type of pastry is called a panzerotto. A panzerotto was created in Southern and Central Italy. Panzerotto is a type of savory turnover, similar to a calzone. While similar to a calzone with shape and dough, Panzerotto are typically fried instead of baked. Common fillings for these pastries include ham, tomato, mozzarella, spinach, baby corn, and mushrooms.

Pastries are a very popular part of cuisine in many different cultures. Although different cultures create pastries in many different forms, they are standard in the form of dough created. No matter where you travel in the world, you’ll be able to experience amazing pastries that differ greatly from other areas.


What Makes Gelato Different From Normal Ice Cream?

hollywood_gelato-gelato-case2A lot of people assume that gelato is simply the Italian word for ice cream. While it is true that you can find gelato at any Italian ice cream shop, gelato and ice cream actually have a few noticeable differences.

If you’d like to know more about these differences, keep reading! You’ll soon learn all about the differences between these two delicious treats.

Gelato Is Smoother

Ice cream tends to be hard and firm. As a matter of fact, cold ice cream can be difficult to scoop out from a container.

Gelato, on the other hand, is both softer and smoother. People love the light texture that it has. If you’re interested in eating a big bowl of gelato, it will be easy for you to scoop it out.

It Contains Less Cream

Ice cream contains a great deal of cream, and it also contains a lot of butter fat. This is actually one of the reasons that ice cream tends to be hard. The butterfat content of ice cream makes it very thick and very heavy.

Gelato doesn’t contain as much cream as ice cream does. In some cases, this means that gelato contains less fat. It is estimated that your typically ice cream has between 11 and 25% fat. In contrast, gelato has between 4 and 9% fat.

If you want to indulge yourself, but are trying to cut back, having gelato instead of ice cream could be a very smart idea.

The differences between gelato and ice cream aren’t all that drastic. With that said, it is clear that the two substances are different from each other.

If you have never had gelato before, you should give it a try. You might be impressed when you see what it tastes like.


Fresh Fall Produce

As you begin to eat more organic and farm to table foods this fall, here are some things that are in season that you should be looking out for (If you don’t live in NYC, you can find fresh produce in season for your state here: http://www.sustainabletable.org/seasonalfoodguide/)

In New York City:

Apples
Beans
Beets
Blueberries
Broccoli
Broccoli Rabe
Brussel Sprouts
Cabbage
Carrots
Cauliflower
Celery
Celery Root
Chard
Chicories
Corn
Cranberries
Cucumber
Eggplant
Fennel
Garlic
Grapes
Greens
Kale
Kohlrabi
Leeks
Lettuce
Lima Beans
Melons
Mushrooms
Okra
Onions
Oregano
Parsley
Parsnips
Pears
Peas
Peppers
Potatoes
Pumpkin
Radicchio
Radishes
Raspberries
Rutabaga
Spinach
Summer Squash
Tomatoes
Turnips
Watermelon
Winter Squash